Image0043Some things about horse care are fairly simple. However, communication between the farrier and the vet is often technical, and it is very important. I spent about fifteen years trimming and shoeing horses before I became a veterinarian, so I understand the technical requirements, experience and just plain, hard work required in this demanding profession. Cooperation between our two aspects of equine athletic health is imperative, and not something that can be done with an email or simple shoeing prescription. This is usually done best in person, one on one, as a team.

One of the wonderful things about technology is our ability to take radiographs (X-rays) and look at the images on the laptop computer right in the back seat of my pickup! This allows me to work closely with farriers and get things done right, or as close to right as possible, the first time. Some cases may require another set of eyes to figure out a diagnostic or treatment plan. Digital x-ray systems can easily transmit images anywhere there is internet service, so we can get help from the foremost experts in the world with the click of a mouse. As a member of the Farriers of Idaho Guild (FIG), I attend and teach at farrier clinics several times each year. I have a good working relationship with other FIG members, so if you don’t already have a farrier, I can recommend. I am confident that we can work together the give your horse the best care available. Give us a call.